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The New Serg Beret

Talking and Writing About Cinema Since 2012

Month

October 2014

“Bitter Beloved”

It’s been four years now
I have not seen your face
In person
Only in binary images
Living on a page

You look so happy
You fell in love again
With the man you cheated
On a stupid boy with
It’s funny how that works

If only I had
Given all my strength
Then I would not be
Your bitter beloved boy

How far did I fall
When you let go of my
Hand?
I wish I had not been
Your bitter beloved boy

He will protect you
Comfort and consult you
I could never provide it
I was always so selfish
Wanted to have you
But never embraced you

You grew impatient
Sought out something better
Gave yourself to him
Pushed me aside
Yet I deserved it all

If only I had
The courage to give it all
Then I would not be
Your bitter beloved boy

How far did you run
When you let go of my
Heart?
I wish I had not been
Your bitter beloved boy

A broken man now
Still aches and pain
About you
You don’t seem to care now
And that’s for the best

If only I had
The love to give to you
Then I would not be
Your bitter beloved boy

How fast did we burst
When we let go of our
Hands?
I wish I was not
Your bitter beloved boy

Villains of Pop Culture File #9799: Mr. McMahon (WWF/WWE Attitude Era)

Written by Sergio Berrueta

vince-mcmahon

Name: Mr. McMahon
Played by: Vincent Kennedy McMahon
First Appearance: 1997 as Mr. McMahon. 1980 as himself.
Villain Type: Heel Wrestler, Corporate Boss
Crimes Committed: Screwed Bret Hart, Screwed ‘Stone Cold’ Steve Austin, Deemed the Higher Power in the Ministry of Darkness, Adultery, Etc.
Status: Alive

On November 9, 1997, the entirety of the World Wrestling Federation was in shock over the shocking decision of Bret Hart losing the title to Shawn Michaels, despite not tapping and submitting. This incident became known as the Montreal Screwjob. The figure head of the WWF, Vincent Kennedy McMahon, was interviewed by commentator Jim Ross who asked McMahon who screwed over who. McMahon simply replied with “Bret screwed Bret” and from there, Mr. McMahon was born.

Mr. McMahon was an exaggerated version of Vince McMahon and to talk about him would probably take ages, so this is the attitude era we are focusing on when Mr. McMahon was in his prime. Mr. McMahon was in the midst of a heated battle with Hart, but when Hart left, him and his corporation had a new target: “Stone Cold” Steve Austin.

With Austin starting to rise, Mr. McMahon was at the charge and ready to attack as Austin did not give a crap about authority at all. Austin started getting extreme pops with Mr. McMahon getting nuclear heat. It had a slow build after his grueling match with Owen Hart and having to be out of wrestling, but Austin made his presence clear…by stunning the boss.

From then on, Mr. McMahon began to screw out Austin on his chances to become the championship. From trying to get Mike Tyson to calm his ass down to getting Kane and the Undertaker to do his dirty deeds, Mr. McMahon did not pull any punches. He even vacated the title just to create a tournament for the WWF Championship belt. Austin struck back by threatening to kill Mr. McMahon on live television. this lead Mr. McMahon to fire him.

After a grueling tournament for the championship, The Rock walked away with the title while Austin suffered getting screwed after having just came back to enter the tournament. Austin demanded a Royal Rumble spot, but Mr. McMahon put at the number 1 spot to screw him out of the main event slot at WrestleMania. Mr. McMahon left the Royal Rumble after leave from the bottom rope to duke it out with Austin and won the Rumble by his own evil deeds.

The next night on Raw, then-commissioner Shawn Michaels and Steve Austin let Mr. McMAhon taste his own medicine. Mr. McMahon was going to have someone compete for him as a replacement, yet according to the WWF Rule Book, the winner of the Royal Rumble must give up their spot in the main event if they are unwilling to compete.

Naturally, this lead to a cage match at the next Pay-Per-View.

The winner of the match would get to compete in WrestleMania against The Rock and at St. Valentine’s Day Massacre, it all came to a glorious match with Vince setting a trap for Austin to lose the chance to be in the spotlight. He would call upon newly hired Paul Wight aka Big Show to end Austin and get himself in the main event. What happened after is…well, legendary.

Austin won his chance to go to WrestleMania XV and defeat The Rock in front of disgruntled Mr. McMahon. With Mankind coming in to step as referee, Austin walked away the champion with Mr. McMahon looking like a jackass in the process.

After, Mr. McMahon would send Austin into a fued with the Undertaker and somehow end up going against Triple H with the whole McMahon family being a part of the storylines. When Austin returned again at the main event of the card against The Rock, McMahon seemingly finally won something of his own: Austin turning heel and going over to his side.

Mr. McMahon was at the top against Steve Austin and continued to be a bastard for years with conning out wrestlers, sleeping with divas and getting into a bizarre, yet charming feud with Donald Trump. Mr. McMahon is someone wrestlers looked forward to and dearly miss.

Friendly Film Perspectives: “The Wicker Man” (1973) *NSFW*

Hosts Sergio Berrueta and Matthew Reveles continue their journey through the Five Stages of Horror for the “Mystery” stage with 1973’s “The Wicker Man.” The duo enter the island of Summerisle to talk about the battle of religious views, the chilling music, apples, and foreskin.
The host also talk about their favorite Treehouse of Horror segments in the opener. 

Find Matthew @ ohheylookatthatthing.tumblr.com

Find Sergio @ Twitter.com/SergBeret & sergberettumbles.tumblr.com

The Wicker Man is copyright of British Lion Holdings Ltd. and Canal+ Group © 1973 British Lion Films.
Buy it from Amazon: http://amzn.com/B00G3DA63Y

Music Featured:
“Tennis Court” (Instrumental) by Lorde © 2013 Universal Music NZ Ltd.
“Theme from The Outer Limits” © 1963 MGM Studios
“The Landlord’s Daughter” by Paul Giovanni & Magnet © 1973 Trunk Records
“Rollin at 5,″ “Night of Chaos” & “Theme for Harold (Var. 2)” by Kevin McLeod from Incomptech.com

Video Footage Used:
“King Kong,” “Dracula,” “The Wolf Man,” “Frankenstein,” “The Bride of Frankenstein,” “Creature from the Black Lagoon,” “The Invisible Man,” “The Hunchback of Notre Dame,” “An American Werewolf in London,” “Shaun of the Dead” © Universal Pictures
“Surspria” © 1977 Seda Spettacoli
“Dead Alive” & “The Cabin in the Woods” © Lionsgate
“Tucker and Dale vs. Evil” © 2010 Magnolia Pictures
“Zombieland” © 2009 Columbia Pictures
“The Simpsons: Treehouse of Horror XXIV” © 2013 Fox Broadcasting Company
“The Wicker Man” © 1973 British Lion Holdings Ltd. & Canal+ Group
“The Wicker Man” © 2006 Warner Bros. Pictures

No copyright infringement intended.

Copyright Disclaimer :
17 USC section 107
17 U.S.C. § 107
Notwithstanding the provisions of sections 17 U.S.C. § 106 and 17 U.S.C. § 106A, the fair use of a copyrighted work, including such use by reproduction in copies or phonorecords or by any other means specified by that section, for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching (including multiple copies for classroom use), scholarship, or research, is not an infringement of copyright. In determining whether the use made of a work in any particular case is a fair use the factors to be considered shall include: the purpose and character of the use, including whether such use is of a commercial nature or is for nonprofit educational purposes; the nature of the copyrighted work; the amount and substantiality of the portion used in relation to the copyrighted work as a whole; and the effect of the use upon the potential market for or value of the copyrighted work. The fact that a work is unpublished shall not itself bar a finding of fair use if such finding is made upon consideration of all the above factors.

Villains of Pop Culture File #1818: Dr. Victor Frankenstein (Frankenstein)

Written by Patrick Raissi

Kenneth Branagh as Victor Frankenstein by LizDoucheFolie at deviantART (http://lizdoucefolie.deviantart.com/)
Kenneth Branagh as Victor Frankenstein by LizDoucheFolie at deviantART (lizdoucefolie.deviantart.com)

Name: Victor Frankenstein
Played by: Various actors
First Appearance: Frankenstein; or the Modern Prometheus by Mary Shelley (1818)
Villain Type: Mad Scientist
Crimes Committed: Exhuming the bodies of the dead, reassembling together to create a living being, abandoning said creature, probably one of the greatest cases of arrogance ever seen.
Status: Deceased

“It’s alive! …Oh, in the name of God! Now I know what it feels like to be God!” Within that sentence itself are the various reasons why Victor Frankenstein is a villain.

Can you believe that one of the most well-known horror stories started with a sleep over? Mary Shelley began her story of a man driven completely by his ambition of beating God at his own game after having a walking nightmare, “I saw the pale student of unhallowed arts kneeling beside the thing he had put together. I saw the hideous phantasm of a man stretched out, and then, on the working of some powerful engine, show signs of life, and stir with an uneasy, half vital motion.” (Frankenstein, 1818).

Frankenstein by Mary Shelley

The story of Frankenstein begins in the end where Victor explains his life to an explorer and how his actions led him to the North Pole in search of his creation. In his narration he explains how his childhood sweetheart (and future wife), Elizabeth, entered his life. Frankenstein’s childhood is pretty normal until he enters his teens, which is when his eccentricities begin to manifest in his interest in Alchemy and its fabled elixir of life. Victor loses interest in these once he views a demonstration of electricity however.

The decent of Victor Frankenstein is a slow burn, which begins once he attends university. Before leaving for university, his mother catches scarlet fever and dies. While at university he becomes immersed in the world of science. His entire life becomes devoted to his studies; he ignores any possible social life and his family and focuses on the creation and decay of life. After years, Victor has mastered all that school has to offer to him.

There is one thing Victor has not yet mastered though: the power of life itself! He begins his horrid plans of reflecting God in his creation of man. However upon creating his Adam, he becomes horrified at the appearance of the creature and the realization of what he has done and flees in terror, basically mimicking an episode of Maury.

I'll let the gift do the talking
I’ll let the gif do the talking

This one act of neglect causes the chain reaction that leads to the death of those close to Victor including his best friend, his brother, and his wife on their wedding day. This causes Victor to swear vengeance upon his creation and hunt him down. What we come to learn toward the conclusion however is the “monster” is actually an eloquent, gentle soul, who in being neglected, and hated merely due to his appearance became bitter and angry at his creator for forcing this life upon him. When Frankenstein saw a monster, he should’ve seen a living being capable of good. But due to Victor’s lack of responsibility, his monster became reflection of Victor’s ambition and arrogance.

The legacy Victory Frankenstein leaves upon the world is carried on not by him, but by his creation. In the end Frankenstein’s creation got what he wanted and is now one of the most beloved monster’s in the world and has appeared in countless adaptation (my favorite one includes tap dancing).

Friendly Film Perspectives: “Creature from the Black Lagoon” (1954)

Hosts Sergio Berrueta and Matthew Reveles enter the Five Stages of Horror by entering the “Classic” first with 1954’s “Creature from the Black Lagoon.” Watch as the duo take a dip to discuss the film’s legacy, Julia Adams’ screaming and the awkward breathing of Gil-Man himself.
The hosts also talk about their first horror films and the Cryptkeeper.

Find Matthew @ ohheylookatthatthing.tumblr.com

Find Sergio @ Twitter.com/SergBeret & sergberettumbles.tumblr.com

Creature from the Black Lagoon is copyright of Universal Studios © 1954 Universal International Pictures
Buy It from Amazon: http://amzn.com/0783240953

Music featured includes:
“Tennis Court” (Instrumental) by Lorde © 2013 Universal Music NZ Ltd.
“Rollin at 5,″ “Night of Chaos” & “Theme for Harold (Var. 2)” by Kevin McLeod from Incomptech.com

Video Footage Used:
“King Kong,” “Dracula,” “The Wolf Man,” “Frankenstein,” “The Bride of Frankenstein,” “Creature from the Black Lagoon,” “The Invisible Man,” “The Hunchback of Notre Dame,” “An American Werewolf in London,” “Shaun of the Dead” © Universal Pictures
Suspria © 1977 Seda Spettacoli
“Dead Alive” & “The Cabin in the Woods” © Lionsgate
“Tucker and Dale vs. Evil” © 2010 Magnolia Pictures
“Zombieland” © 2009 Columbia Pictures

Copyright Disclaimer :
17 USC section 107
17 U.S.C. § 107
Notwithstanding the provisions of sections 17 U.S.C. § 106 and 17 U.S.C. § 106A, the fair use of a copyrighted work, including such use by reproduction in copies or phonorecords or by any other means specified by that section, for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching (including multiple copies for classroom use), scholarship, or research, is not an infringement of copyright. In determining whether the use made of a work in any particular case is a fair use the factors to be considered shall include: the purpose and character of the use, including whether such use is of a commercial nature or is for nonprofit educational purposes; the nature of the copyrighted work; the amount and substantiality of the portion used in relation to the copyrighted work as a whole; and the effect of the use upon the potential market for or value of the copyrighted work. The fact that a work is unpublished shall not itself bar a finding of fair use if such finding is made upon consideration of all the above factors.

Villains of Pop Culture File #7705- Darth Vader (Star Wars Original Trilogy)

 

By Serg Beret

DISCLAIMER: This focuses on Darth Vader from the original Star Wars trilogy with Anakin Skywalker covered in a separate entry. Though they are one, I feel they should be covered in different parts to get the full story.

darth-vader-face

Villain File #7783
Name:
Darth Vader (aka Anakin Skywalker)
Played by:
James Earl Jones (Voice), David Prowse (Body)
First Appearance: 
Star Wars (1977)
Villain Type: Sith Lord
Crimes Committed: Blowing up Alderaan, Corruption of Power, Tyranny, Dismembering His Own Son, Not Paying Child Support
Status: Deceased

Darth Vader, the lord of the evil Galactic Empire and Sith Lord, knows the essence of power and corrupting someone’s mind with evil in the original trilogy.

Back in the 1970’s, George Lucas had a vision for an epic space opera saga that would become Star Wars, Darth Vader was created to be the big bad of the series at this point in time. Vader’s look and feel was based off the classic science fiction serials that Lucas grew up with in his youth. Vader’s was designed by Ralph McQuarrie and intended only to be his spacesuit in the original draft before being the permanent outfit of the character. One odd choice was to blend sci-fi elements, such as Vader’s robotic limbs and iron lung, with classic samurai style made famous by director Akira Kurosawa (Seven Samurai, Throne of Blood).

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Even going as far as getting a Samurai figure years later

This lead to a menacing and fearful design that encompassed the evil within him. In 1977, Vader finally made his presence known by capturing Princess Leia, played by Carrie Fisher, in her ship and showing the audience that he meant business with a arrogant demeanor and the voice of James Earl Jones. The body itself was done portrayed by David Prowse with Bob Anderson doing the stunt work.

Of course, this is just the beginning of his madness as he controls his planet-sized space station known as the Death Star, which has the ability to destroy whole planets with a huge laser. He uses this, alongside his lackey Grand Moff Tarkin, played by Peter Cushing, displaying the full power of his Death Star’s beam.

If that wasn’t enough, his evil Empire was trying to take over the entire galaxy. Luckily, the Rebels defeated him with the help of Luke Skywalker, played by Mark Hamill, blowing up the Death Star and Han Solo, played by Harrison Ford, for shooting him out the way.

Unfortunately, that was just the first film. In The Empire Strikes Back, Vader has his Empire…well, just read the title. His Galactic Empire took over Hoth & Cloud City in Bespin by defeating the Rebels under the order of The Emperor Darth Sidious, played by Ian McDiarmid. He also decides to freeze Han Solo in carbonite after Lando Calrissian, played by Billy Dee Williams, betrayed him and gave Han away to Boba Fett. In a famous duel with Luke, he chops off his hand and then reveals the stunning revelation that he is his father. Darth Vader does roughly translate to “dark father,” but even that was a dick move.

Vader’s end comes in Return of the Jedi as the second Death Star is being created. In the midst of an epic duel with his son in front of the Emperor, Darth Vader sees the beating his son is taking and decides to save him from his misery in a final act of heroic and overcoming the dark side once and for all. Sadly, Vader would leave himself behind with his creation to show that he still had some good in him.

Darth Vader is arguably the greatest and most iconic villain out the Star Wars series. He is practically the face of the series, which is a rare honor for villains. Vader’s legacy has carried on in countless merchandise from toys to clothing, video game appearances such as Star Wars: The Force Unleashed where he trains a new apprentice & Soul Caliber IV, and at Disney theme parks where he is ready to find the Rebel spy on Star Tours: The Adventure Continues. The saga of Star Wars would eventually return to the big screen in 1999 with the Prequel Trilogy exploring the man behind Darth Vader, but that is best saved for another villain file very soon.

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